The majority of flaws in submitted games

18 posts (showing 1-18)
Gsquadron

Market Level 0Community Level 3
5 posts

Hello,

I did a research on lots of games and found out that people make some ridiculous mistakes sometimes and have amazing games.

So here is what I noticed the most of flaws.

1. They do not add WASD and Arrows support in game. They either support one or the other.

2. Bad resolution. There are amazing games which have very low resolutions.

3. UI/UX design. You truly think that buttons players click don't count, only the game?

There were some horrendous UI designs that were way off the graphics of the game itself which is crazy. It looked very unprofessional and childish to say the least. Same goes for resolution, why would you want a small screen? But WASD is a classic. I remember I did not include arrows in the first game I made and you can lose 5%-10% of gamers just because of that. So people doing that look very amateur cuz they remind me of my own mistakes. They also prevent sponsors into buying or sponsoring your game.

Hope this helped you in some way! :D

Bonus: Bad grammar. Those people doing that are just retarded. Full stop.

posted 2016-06-16T18:21:12-07:00
Argentin

Market Level 5Community Level 8
1674 posts

Gsquadron said:

Hello,

I did a research on lots of games and found out that people make some ridiculous mistakes sometimes and have amazing games.

So here is what I noticed the most of flaws.

1. They do not add WASD and Arrows support in game. They either support one or the other.

2. Bad resolution. There are amazing games which have very low resolutions.

3. UI/UX design. You truly think that buttons players click don't count, only the game?

There were some horrendous UI designs that were way off the graphics of the game itself which is crazy. It looked very unprofessional and childish to say the least. Same goes for resolution, why would you want a small screen? But WASD is a classic. I remember I did not include arrows in the first game I made and you can lose 5%-10% of gamers just because of that. So people doing that look very amateur cuz they remind me of my own mistakes. They also prevent sponsors into buying or sponsoring your game.

Hope this helped you in some way! :D

Bonus: Bad grammar. Those people doing that are just retarded. Full stop.

You made some good observations, but your tone seems a bit offensive.

You have to consider a lot of devs are hobbysts or kids who are just starting to learn all these stuff.

I started makig "games" when I was 17, and I didn't know anything back then, but that's the whole point.

You make crappy games so you can learn from all th mistakes you WILL make. The only retarded thing would be not to learn from those mistakes, but making them is good.

I certainly agree with you there are some very common mistakes people make, and if you really wanted to help, you could even try making a more detailed list with all the mistakes developers usually do.

But I do however think the UI design shouldn't really be on your list. Yes, devs will probably create crappy UI designs at first, but that's a whole skill on it's own, and you can't just learn it overnight. So simply saying, your design sucks, won't really help.

Saying however it's usually good to have both WASD & the arrows keys in your game, is what I would consider ecellent advice as a beginner.

posted 2016-06-16T18:45:29-07:00
Gsquadron

Market Level 0Community Level 3
5 posts

Yeah, I was thinking too to remove offensive words, but rethought it and maybe it might make people remind of those mistakes so they never do them again, but oh well. :)

posted 2016-06-16T19:11:19-07:00
FGL_Alexey

FGL AdminCommunity Level 2
65 posts

Great thread! I've made 1500+ video reviews so far at FGL and once I summarized my suggestions which I give to the developers as a talk "So, you've made a game..." which includes the advice I give at the pre-review about how to make the completed game better with little effort.

1. Make sure you have a proper game screens navigation.

If you are going to stay in gamedev for long and use the same technology to create several games (not necessarily of the same series) it's even useful to make a game template, which would enable such navigation:

And don't forget to let the player mute the music from any game screen.

posted 2016-06-16T20:07:05-07:00
Gsquadron

Market Level 0Community Level 3
5 posts

FGL_Alexey said:

Great thread! I've made 1500+ video reviews so far at FGL and once I summarized my suggestions which I give to the developers as a talk "So, you've made a game..." which includes the advice I give at the pre-review about how to make the completed game better with little effort.

1. Make sure you have a proper game screens navigation.

If you are going to stay in gamedev for long and use the same technology to create several games (not necessarily of the same series) it's even useful to make a game template, which would enable such navigation:

And don't forget to let the player mute the music from any game screen.

Great advice Alexey!

posted 2016-06-16T20:12:21-07:00
FGL_Alexey

FGL AdminCommunity Level 2
65 posts

OK, let's continue.

Speaking about the Art, I understand, that the standards are constantly increasing and it's difficult for an indie team to make an excellent-looking visuals. For example, here are the screenshots of the games which received the FGL rating of 9 in 2011 (Kingdom Rush) and 2009 (Top defense).

Top defense was 1-man team, scmorr. The developer drew the visual effects frame-by-frame. For the unit models he used the following technique. He build the 3D-models in Blender, and then created 2D vector images of them using a Blender plugin.

Kingdom rush was made by famous Ironhide Games. The were a team of 3 at that time and had 2 artists, as far as I remember.

So, what about the present days? Can a small team produce good-looking game?

Yes, if you pay attention to the style in general.

2. Make all the game elements fit the same style.

What does it mean? Think of a common concept which can describe all the visuals in the game. And check, does everything on the screen fit the same concept.

For example, for the top-left game the concept can be "cardboard puppet theater". For the top-right game: "everything is cut out of paper". Notice, that not only the game elements look like as if they are cut out of paper, but the interface element fit this style as well.

The bottom-right game is mine :) from Ludum Dare 33. I'm a programmer not an artist. But for this game I picked a concept "Everything consists of polygons with acute angles" and made sure everything, even the fonts, fit this style. The game got the rating of 3.59/5 in Graphics and became #220 of 2727.

One more art advice.

3. Avoid the repetitive patterns, add slight irregularities.

The bottom-left sample illustrates this. Here you can see how the game "Two pipes" looked like before my pre-review, and how it changes after my suggestion to add slight pattern irregularities.

One more irregularities example. When developing a game about a dungeon developer often place torches on the walls. They fire in them are animated, but often these torches'animations are played synchronously. But implementing slight change in the various torches' framerate or initial frame would make the picture much more visually appealing.

posted 2016-06-17T20:20:53-07:00 | edited 2016-06-17T20:22:50-07:00
Gsquadron

Market Level 0Community Level 3
5 posts

Nice and yeah art style is very important to make the game attractive to the eye.

I believe the art style of Kingdom Rush is still in trend.

posted 2016-06-17T20:30:15-07:00
FGL_Alexey

FGL AdminCommunity Level 2
65 posts

It is so much in trend that every week I see the game with octangular buttons :)

But (as we speek of the common mistakes), from "Kingdom rush has octangular buttons" is not derived "the game with octangular buttons will be as successful as Kingdom Rush" :)

posted 2016-06-17T21:13:15-07:00
Argentin

Market Level 5Community Level 8
1674 posts

Here's some UI redesign for one of my games, to give you a sense of how and why to arrange your buttons & icons in such a way they don't distract the player's attention from important elements.

posted 2016-06-18T06:40:39-07:00 | edited 2016-06-18T06:41:51-07:00
FGL_Alexey

FGL AdminCommunity Level 2
65 posts

Great example, Argentin!

The next advice I'll give is for the games which have in-game shop.

4. Inform the player if anything can be bought after the level is over

Many games have the Shop button on the Level complete screen. It's good to make it blink or highlight it in any other way if anything can be bought by the player. Thus, the player will have better user experience.

posted 2016-06-18T21:01:38-07:00 | edited 2016-06-18T21:02:02-07:00
FGL_Alexey

FGL AdminCommunity Level 2
65 posts

5. If you have an animation effect for changing the screens, disable the screen's controls right after the changing process started, and then don't forget to re-enable it later.

posted 2016-06-21T15:55:48-07:00 | edited 2016-06-21T15:56:16-07:00
FGL_Alexey

FGL AdminCommunity Level 2
65 posts

Let's continue. A very important suggestion came to my mind during the previous pre-review.

6. Make your gameflow FPS-independent

While I'm screencasting, the FPS of the games I play sometimes drops, more or less. It depends on the game's optimisation. But this feature lets me see how will the game be played on a weaker devices.

Often the game developers (and I was among them) code the game logic in this way:

Inside the Enter Frame event the game objects change their positions by a fixed amount.

Thus, on a slower devices everything in the game will become slower.

To avoid this and to make sure that for every player the gameplay experience will be the same, there are 2 possible solutions.

a) move the game logic from Enter Frame to Timer event.

b) modify what's happenning inside you Enter Frame event this way:

- calculate the time which has passed since the last Enter Frame event

- move the game objects to the distances which correspond this time (and their standard speed)

posted 2016-07-12T08:33:05-07:00
FGL_Alexey

FGL AdminCommunity Level 2
65 posts

7. Forgive slight player's mistakes

You, as a developer, know every detail of your game. You played it multiple times before the release. So, your perception of a game's difficulty might drastically differ from the perception of the players who play it for the first time in their life. Yes, quite a number of developers set the difficulty in their game to be too high.

Especially this tendency became wide-spread after the success of Flappy Bird. Many beginner developers thought, that if a super-difficult game became popular, that if they'd made a super-difficult game, it will instantly become popular. We've got a flood of really difficult games, but most of them failed to grab the player's attention.

But the point is that even "hardcore" game doesn't mean "punish the player for every mistake".You don't need the player to leave after the first mistake. Let's look at one of the classic games, Canabalt. It gave birth to the whole genre of runners-jumpers. The game is really difficult, but addictive. The treatment of the players' mistakes in interesting there.

The real platforms' sizes in the game engine are a few pixels more than the platforms' visuals. This gives the player an chance to jump right from the edge, even to be tiny bit of second late, but still jump from the very edge of the platform. Thus, the player experiences a "near-miss" emotion, which tightens the link to the game.

Another good example of how forgiveness increases game's playability is Super Sneak Story. In this game you play as a robber who mustn't be spotted by police. In most of the games of this genre "being spotted" = "game over". But not in this one. If the policeman sees you, the new game phase starts: a Chase! You still have a chance to evade the police. Even if the distance between the burglar's and the policeman's sprites is few pixels, you still have a chance to perform an unexpected maneuver and hide.


This advice can be applied to the game of any genre. For example, in any game which has bonuses and enemies, you can make the actual sizes of the bonuses slightly bigger than their visuals, and the enemies - slightly smaller.

Always keep in mind, that the players see your game for the first time in their lives. And they have a great variety of games to play, instead of yours. And your task is to keep their attention.

So, forgive slight player's mistakes. 

posted 2016-07-28T13:35:39-07:00
laFunk

Market Level 4Community Level 3
142 posts

Nice tips! I didn't know Cannabalt had that extra size on its platforms, that's cool. Here's a couple of things I usually do:

In platformers add a little buffer to the jump key press, this way the player can jump some frames before even touching the floor. Also try giving a little extra frames where the player can still jump once he starts falling off a platform.

In shooters make the enemies hitboxes bigger than they look, and the player hitboxes smaller.

posted 2016-07-30T13:37:39-07:00
RSorder

Market Level 0Community Level 0
0 posts

great thread!!!!!!

posted 2016-08-01T03:12:18-07:00
Argentin

Market Level 5Community Level 8
1674 posts

A very common mistake a keep seeing in games with shops or upgrades, is they use text like "Buy" or "Upgrade" on the button, and the price somewhere near.

The best thing you can do to save space is to have the price directly on the button.

posted 2016-08-01T10:02:06-07:00 | edited 2016-08-01T10:02:34-07:00
Gsquadron

Market Level 0Community Level 3
5 posts

Argentin said:

A very common mistake a keep seeing in games with shops or upgrades, is they use text like "Buy" or "Upgrade" on the button, and the price somewhere near.

The best thing you can do to save space is to have the price directly on the button.

This really helped, thanks! :D

posted 2016-08-01T12:12:15-07:00
Argentin

Market Level 5Community Level 8
1674 posts

Castellum Market evolution

(I'll probably make a video with more details)

-Keep text to a MINIMUM

-Centralize item details in a single box

posted 2016-08-03T07:28:00-07:00 | edited 2016-08-03T07:36:13-07:00