Is flash finally dead on FGL??

51 posts (showing 1-20)
ksoft

Market Level 0Community Level 0
0 posts

Hello!

I don't see Flash category in Browse Games anymore. Does it means that FGL is about to drop Flash support?

Do sponsors also no longer see Flash games anymore?

Is there any reason in creating a Flash game to sell it on FGL now?

posted 2016-05-12T17:16:29-07:00
ProtectionGames

Market Level 0Community Level 1
3 posts

That can be it. But the question is what are the sponsors are looking for now?

It seems to me that the market is going to mobile games and the online games are slowly dying. Or HTML5 is the future for online games.

What do you think?

posted 2016-05-12T19:51:37-07:00
ksoft

Market Level 0Community Level 0
0 posts

I don't care much about the technology really, but I wonder is it possible to earn enough money ($2-3k) on mobile games with comparable efforts?

posted 2016-05-12T19:58:06-07:00
ProtectionGames

Market Level 0Community Level 1
3 posts

ksoft said:

I don't care much about the technology really, but I wonder is it possible to earn enough money ($2-3k) on mobile games with comparable efforts?

Using ads maybe but getting into the mobile market and being noticed is a lot harder than online games market. Bare in mind that you also need to port your games for both Android and Ios. 

But how much would a sponsor pay for a mobile app and what type of games are they looking for is a question that needs to be answered.

 

posted 2016-05-12T20:20:16-07:00
ksoft

Market Level 0Community Level 0
0 posts

I'm basically afraid that mobile games require much more content and of higher quality.

About ports, I hope that for games crossplatform tools would work much better than for apps (no need to maintain consistent UIs for each platform).

posted 2016-05-12T21:54:36-07:00
ProtectionGames

Market Level 0Community Level 1
3 posts

ksoft said:

I'm basically afraid that mobile games require much more content and of higher quality.

About ports, I hope that for games crossplatform tools would work much better than for apps (no need to maintain consistent UIs for each platform).

It's actually the other way around a mobile game needs to be simple a game that a user plays while waiting in a line or eating in a restaurant  or whatever, I believe these type of games keeps the user playing your game daily and a number of sessions a day, Though the quality of the game should be perfect no one wants to download a game that takes space in his/her mobile and the game is in bad quality. And by quality I mean good looking graphics and a fluent, free of bugs game.

But the challenge is getting noticed in a store like Google Play or AppStore it's really hard to get people to download your game without marketing. 

posted 2016-05-12T22:13:55-07:00
FGL_Dave

FGL AdminCommunity Level 4
284 posts

It can be very challenging to get noticed on mobile, but at the same time if you do have even a mildly successful game it will not only make you $1-3k, it will probably make you $1-3k every month for it's lifetime (generally 1-6 months).

I would absolutely recommend getting into mobile games development - a few years ago developers were saying it's the future of indie development - it's no longer the future, it is now! Don't miss the boat on it :)

posted 2016-05-13T07:15:34-07:00 | edited 2016-05-13T07:16:12-07:00
purplelava

Market Level 0Community Level 0
8 posts

"It seems to me that the market is going to mobile games and the online games are slowly dying."

Maybe it is VERY slowly being replaced by mobile games, but still plenty of people play browser games at work (and school?). That market will be dead only when most office jobs will disappear...even if computers die, they will be replaced by tablet devices and people will play games on those...still in the browsers, before downloading anything. 

What I don't understand is why it's developers who forgot Flash first, not sponsors...as far as I see big sponsors like Armor Games still get more Flash games than HTML5. Casual flash games alone are a guarantee that Flash won't disappear until those portals give it up. Eventually it's so convenient over HTML5 for a number of reasons that they still choose Flash. Correct me if I'm wrong. All I see on Armor Games and similars are Flash games. What's ACTUALLY dead is the Unity web player. Deprecated by Unity, replaced by WEBGL. 

I am making some games with Stencyl, which can now export both Flash and HTML5. I don't have a problem making games in both versions, and then mobile and desktop too. But I think I will publish these games as Flash first and foremost, as I think they give me the most guarantee I will get sponsored by one of the big portals. Again, Unity is gone, and feasible only for WEBGL, with tons of limitations...I am targetting Flash and mobile to begin. No HTML5!

I don't understand why FGL keeps the Unity marketplace and gave up the Flash one...as far as I'm concerned Flash is more alive than Unity webplayer. 

Until I see most games on big portals in Flash rather than HTML5, I think the easiest way for me to get sponsored is to make Flash games. And then, it's good to prepare mobile and desktop versions too. 

I'm not convinced focusing on HTML5 is a good idea at all. I don't understand why developers rushed that quickly. Maybe for contract work, HTML5 makes sense. But for indie games seeking sponsorships, I see no reason to focus on HTML since portals still maonly showcase, and supposedly sponsor Flash games. 

For portals, the Flash plugin is apparently still more convenient. They didn't rush to get rid of Flash as quickly as developers did. This is an absurd case of developers trying to get ahead of themselves and over-anticipate the market. 

BUT I have only published a single game so far (Flash...) and I'm no expert and maybe I'm wrong. Again, I'm making games for ALL formats. I have no problem exporting to HTML5 if necessary, but I consider the Flash version the most important. More important than the mobile one indeed, which can only succeed based on the success of the flash version and the help of a distributor. 

Flash is alive, long live Flash!

Unity webplayer is GONE, gone forever and having a marketplace for it makes zero sense; Unity is still excellent for mobile and desktop games (and web in the fresh WebGL format). Wish it still had the almighty Flash exporter. 

The developer should follow the needs of the market and its sponsors/distributors - if the sponsors still buy Flash, then the developer should focus on Flash...

I'm on Newgrounds now...mostly Flash, some Unity GL...

posted 2016-05-15T00:19:09-07:00 | edited 2016-05-15T00:20:58-07:00
Argentin

Market Level 5Community Level 8
1674 posts

Technology grows exponentially, so the transition from web to mobile will be much faster then you might expect.

Smartphones, tablets, smartwatches, VR & AR sets are all emerging platforms that show where the world is heading. These devices are starting to become more integrated into our lives, so as developers we need to understand that and follow the people.

Flash might not be dead, and will not die for a while, but I also think we misinterpret that phrase, as we shouldn't ask ourselves if flash is dead, rather we should ask ourselves if flash is still popular, and that answer to that question unfortunately doesn't look too good.

People might still use flash and will continue to use it for a while, but as people integrate mobile devices more and more into their lives, they will start using flash based technologies less and less.

Unity is a great tool that allows devs to keep targeting the web players that still exist, but also take advantage of the new mobile platforms, so to me, whoever jumped on the Unity boat made the safest bet when it comes to developing games for both now and the future.

posted 2016-05-15T08:36:15-07:00 | edited 2016-05-15T08:37:40-07:00
TheDeveloper

Market Level 0Community Level 3
233 posts

Argentin said:

Unity is a great tool that allows devs to keep targeting the web players that still exist, but also take advantage of the new mobile platforms, so to me, whoever jumped on the Unity boat made the safest bet when it comes to developing games for both now and the future.

I am pretty sure adobe flash / animate also exports to both mobile and web, and actually has the advantage of exporting to a web plugin that is still actually supported by every major webrowser today, over the unity plugin that is supported by virtually no one.

posted 2016-05-15T17:12:28-07:00
stupidlikeafox

Market Level 6Community Level 7
999 posts

I think the question that should be asked is, "Can you readily monetize your work in Flash?". For me, it's a no. For you, maybe?

posted 2016-05-15T23:04:51-07:00
Argentin

Market Level 5Community Level 8
1674 posts

On May 15, 2016, TheDeveloper said:

I am pretty sure adobe flash / animate also exports to both mobile and web, and actually has the advantage of exporting to a web plugin that is still actually supported by every major webrowser today, over the unity plugin that is supported by virtually no one.

Again, it's not a question of possibility rather a question of viability.

Yes, you can export flash games to mobile, but they will simply not perform as good as a unity game dues to it's mobile limitations. I'm not saying flash games aren't still played or can't be fitted to mobile devices.

All I'm saying is it's going to be harder and harder to make money using flash as the platform is in decline compared to other engines that perform better on emerging devices.

posted 2016-05-16T10:41:06-07:00 | edited 2016-05-16T10:41:37-07:00
JohnBlackburne

Market Level 3Community Level 10
2184 posts

Argentin said:

Yes, you can export flash games to mobile, but they will simply not perform as good as a unity game dues to it's mobile limitations. I'm not saying flash games aren't still played or can't be fitted to mobile devices.

I think this is far too broad and out of date. Modern mobile devices are as powerful as desktop PCs where it matters, i.e. CPU and GPU. They have come on in leaps and bounds and largely caught up in performance.

They are entirely different devices. You cannot just take a desktop game and compile it for mobile and expect it to do well. APIs that worked well on desktop are inappropriate for mobile, such as keyboard input and Flash’s classic 2D display list.

posted 2016-05-16T11:22:59-07:00
b10b

Market Level 4Community Level 7
970 posts

Slightly off topic, and slightly on topic, I've seen a few of these news articles popping up today:

http://www.pcmag.com/news/344483/google-chrome-to-block-flash-by-default

Probably no surprise to see, and I doubt it'll hurt the few of us who enjoy playing Flash games in browser, or the very few of us who can earn money from making such games.  But the general public's support of such block-by-default is testament that truly ubiquitous casual gaming should probably be using something other than Flash Player by now?

I'm Mr Skeptical by nature, so I don't much believe the decline of Flash Player has a great deal to do with bad-user-experience issues.  I suspect its decline is to do with money - specifically ad revenues, and the necessity for ad networks to fulfil an insane amount of inventory across devices (which Flash isn't able to do these days).

posted 2016-05-16T19:49:09-07:00
DelaniStudio

Market Level 2Community Level 5
370 posts

I just wanted to reply with 1 more link...

NAIL TO THE COFFIN http://www.theverge.com/2016/5/15/11679394/chrome-to-block-flash-later-2016

posted 2016-05-16T23:11:56-07:00
Blackizzy

Market Level 1Community Level 5
416 posts

 From what i read, both tells the same thing, chrome blocked by default but still a way to enable it, or did i skip something while reading?

posted 2016-05-17T00:44:53-07:00
djstatika

Market Level 10Community Level 7
1254 posts

As usual the anti-flash brigade are over-hyping...

It definitely not good news for us, but its just a prompt asking if you want to run flash, instead of running by default. If someone is at a flash game website, then they will just click 'yes'. Hopefully it will mean less flash ads around the game.

The bigger problem is that this kind of stuff harms the image of flash and clients etc will want to avoid it and portals will try and encourage HTML5 games instead. But then this has been the way of things for a while now.

I wonder how many of the big facebook games will convert to HTML5 does anyone know which facebook games are HTML5 at the moment?

posted 2016-05-18T11:33:24-07:00
Exhibit-F

Market Level 0Community Level 0
0 posts

The question that should be asked is does the player gives a shit whether the game was built using HTML5 or Flash, of course No! If the game is good enough and performs well.

posted 2016-05-18T13:31:33-07:00
pepperpunk

Market Level 3Community Level 11
2401 posts

So making money on FGL now = use Enhance, and everything else is being phased out?

Html5 bidding system on here was never up to much, so without flash, is there even going to be a bidding system at all?

posted 2016-05-18T13:39:58-07:00 | edited 2016-05-18T13:40:44-07:00
Argentin

Market Level 5Community Level 8
1674 posts

pepperpunk said:

So making money on FGL now = use Enhance, and everything else is being phased out?

Html5 bidding system on here was never up to much, so without flash, is there even going to be a bidding system at all?

Probably not.

Even when Flash was in it's prime, and people had no other choice than to play on desktop, FGL was the only bidding system in the market. Now that desktop is declining and mobile rising, it's pretty obvious to me nobody in their right mind would create another bidding system for desktop games.

FGL is going to mobile for a reason ;)

posted 2016-05-18T14:07:24-07:00