Free Variable-Mu clone compressor plug-in (looks like a Fairchild 660 clone)

4 posts (showing 1-4)
JHII

Market Level 5Community Level 6
716 posts

Like Jason Corsaro once told me, "you can never have too many compressors".

http://www.klanghelm.com/MJUCjr.php

Mac, Win
AAX, AU, RTAS, VST

MJUC jr. is the little brother of the colorful MJUC.

It's a variable-mu** design with lots of vibe. capable of smooth leveling but also heavy pumping effects. With its two gain stages and interstage transformer simulation it offers a very deep and lively soundstage.
The three-position timing switch not only controls the attack and release times of the unit, but also the slew rate of the transformers and the timing of the other parts of the circuitry, that are directly influencing the generated harmonics (saturation). 

MJUC jr. is a mix of Mk1 and Mk2 of its big brother MJUC. It's combining very natural, dense compression characteristics of the early days of this type of compression with a more forward sounding approach and more harmonics creating of the variable-mu comps of the early 1960s. 

MJUC jr. is freeware!

If you find it useful, please check out the big brother MJUC.

posted 2015-07-15T22:23:12-07:00
The Tao of Chris

Market Level 0Community Level 3
249 posts

Thank you for the share.

I have to try it out!

posted 2015-07-31T13:47:49-07:00
The Tao of Chris

Market Level 0Community Level 3
249 posts

Tried it out last night.

It did its job.

I can't really comment on the sound of it, I just threw it on a scratch bass track. (bass direct in to mbox3pro) Nothing else, the sound of the track isn't terrible for not really "going for a sound"

posted 2015-08-01T13:15:53-07:00
JHII

Market Level 5Community Level 6
716 posts

I haven't tried it yet.

660s are known for their particular character which is an odd mixture of 'transparent' but also 'beefy'. I think they only made around 1000 of them and they are all old.. meaning no two sound the same.

I've only used two real ones, the first mildly extensively and the other for a lot shorter of a period. They were both similar, but different. The first one was great on bass, good on vocals and decent on guitar. The second one seemed like it had a more accurate (fast) attack time and was a little more transparent but it just never 'pushed'. The latter would have probably worked really well on vocals, but I had other things at my disposal that I favored at the time for that task.

Brief history: The 660 was made at Les Paul's behest (yet one more thing we have to thank Les Paul for). It's also rumored that it's the main compressor on the vocals for the 60s Beatles recordings.

posted 2015-08-06T03:08:03-07:00