I don

33 posts (showing 1-20)
samuelemarro

Market Level 0Community Level 0
5 posts

I can't understand HTML5 sitelocks logic. If someone creates an HTML5 game, he would like to earn from it. Ads don't work, so he would choose sponsorships. But sponsorships don't seem working, so he would choose sitelocks. But sitelocks require high exposition,and how is it possible to have it if you didn't sell the game to anyone? Am I missing anything?

posted 2015-02-08T13:13:35-08:00
mentuat

Market Level 5Community Level 1
62 posts

think of it more as 'non-exclusive' licensing rather than literally 'site-locks'

You make a product and you license it to a number of sites, simple as that

posted 2015-02-08T16:39:02-08:00
RedSpark

Market Level 0Community Level 2
76 posts

You're correct, sitelocks were a viable option in 2013, when dozens of sponsors would buy html5 sitelocks for good money. But then almost all of them went out of business in 2014, so now html5 portal market is almost dead. Only a few major publishers remain, and they're interested in high-quality games only. But you can still make good living doing contract work for clients and brands interested in mobile-compatible rich media. The downside is, well, you will be still working for some entity as freelancer and doing boring interactive experiences to promote a new soda or tv. Not exactly a gamedev career you were probably dreaming about :)

posted 2015-02-08T16:44:04-08:00 | edited 2015-02-08T16:48:51-08:00
b10b

Market Level 4Community Level 7
970 posts

RedSpark, you nailed it!

A few extra markets include self publish on web, affiliate marketing, social games, steam, mobile app (e.g. via CocoonJS).  So, as tough as it is, it arguably still offers more markets than many other gamedev platforms.

posted 2015-02-08T18:41:46-08:00
xmorpher

Market Level 3Community Level 5
538 posts

That's what i thought...

Eventually all those sponsors that stopped sponsoring flash games and started to sponsor html5 only games

should  return to flash games AND html5...

because if "you can't disregard mobil traffic"... you shouldn't disregard the desktop (flash-supporting) traffic either $$$

posted 2015-02-09T16:56:55-08:00
samuelemarro

Market Level 0Community Level 0
5 posts

So do I have to choose between boring freelancing and self-publishing? That's kinda a shame. Why doesn't sponsorship work for HTML5? I developed for both Flash and HTML5 and I think the only real difference between them is mobile support. Why can't Html5 games get viral?

posted 2015-02-09T18:51:53-08:00
RedSpark

Market Level 0Community Level 2
76 posts

We're in a bubble-oriented industry - investors are subjects to herd mentality.

The next coming bubble is so called 'internet of things' - watch out for its development, because once it gains critical mass we all will be making games for toasters and fridges overnight :)

posted 2015-02-09T18:56:14-08:00
Archbob

Market Level 7Community Level 10
1164 posts

Site-locks were never a real viable strategy for any but the biggest of arcade portals and those found out that the profit in HTML5 web games sucked compared to just making apps. Flash games have always relied on viral spreading of primary sponsorships, the site-lock strategy just isn't as lucrative and won't attract most sponsors. HTML5's format sort of dooms itself on the web. Unlike flash, its standard isn't 1 portable file.

posted 2015-02-20T21:56:52-08:00 | edited 2015-02-20T21:57:16-08:00
arcadeshrine

Market Level 2Community Level 0
4 posts

Can someone put it simply - what is the major problem in html5 games distribution? Can game have a download link to a zip file which will work if unpacked and uploaded to a new website? 

posted 2015-02-25T11:38:41-08:00
Archbob

Market Level 7Community Level 10
1164 posts

Sounds easy enough yet that is not how distribution actually works. Most of the time, people just take the .swf file from popular sites and put it on their own site or use one of the game feeds. Games that can't be packed into 1 file just aren't going to work.

posted 2015-02-25T18:06:09-08:00 | edited 2015-02-25T19:41:37-08:00
b10b

Market Level 4Community Level 7
970 posts

As simple as possible: what can a HTML5 game do that a SWF game cannot?  If the method of distribution / monetization / innovation / growth is not playing to that strength then forget it.

posted 2015-02-25T18:54:34-08:00 | edited 2015-02-25T18:55:58-08:00
renfd

Market Level 1Community Level 2
75 posts

b10b said:

As simple as possible: what can a HTML5 game do that a SWF game cannot?  If the method of distribution / monetization / innovation / growth is not playing to that strength then forget it.

I think the right question is: What can a SWF game do that a HTML5 game cannot? 

posted 2015-02-26T00:43:16-08:00
keybol

Market Level 9Community Level 13
2985 posts

renfd, I may not be familiar with the market. but am I the only one seeing HTML5 games look like crappy 2009 games? Can anybody point me to a highly polished feature packed HTML 5 game that can compete with this titles?

Witch Hunt, Cursed Treasure, Strike Force Heroes 2, Epic Boss Fighter 2, Nitrome games and tons of others that are among the top ten all time games in Kong, Armor or Notdoppler

posted 2015-02-26T05:03:14-08:00
bluebox

Market Level 6Community Level 3
334 posts

I have prepared html5 framework and made few simple games. But it's so poor technology that is efficient only in blitting - wich is amiga500 kind of technology. Also you need prepared tools to make good games, which also take some time. For sure most of this games could be cloned into html5 but will require like 10x cpu power or RAM for that same work.

posted 2015-02-26T07:53:55-08:00
b10b

Market Level 4Community Level 7
970 posts

keybol, there are plenty of feature packed HTML5 games - but they're mostly on Steam (usually wrapped in node-webkit so few people even know they're HTML5).  The "crappy 2009 games" we see are the ones designed on low budgets for mobile web, typically where <256MB RAM and CPU powered graphics are the lowest common denominator so will decimate performance like bluebox says.  I'd say they're closer to 2002-2004 era Flash?

I maintain "HTML5" is a meaningless classification, what's important are users' play habits.  Casual gaming via web browser brought most of us into Flash and launched the hundred billion dollar social gaming industry, the same phenomena went mobile on the back of app stores, the current question is whether it will move back to the browser on mobile?

posted 2015-02-26T17:04:49-08:00
keybol

Market Level 9Community Level 13
2985 posts

I was comparing browser based games for HTML5 and flash. Likewise, flash air games on Steam will be fair to compare to HTML5 games on Steam

posted 2015-02-27T02:19:19-08:00 | edited 2015-02-27T02:21:09-08:00
Archbob

Market Level 7Community Level 10
1164 posts

Also for the browser market, ad blockers are becoming a large issue.

posted 2015-02-27T03:48:10-08:00
Totor

Market Level 0Community Level 2
108 posts

Archbob said:

Also for the browser market, ad blockers are becoming a large issue.

the advertisers shot first.

If there were no interstitials, popup and screaming video ads there would be no need for ad blockers.

posted 2015-02-27T16:31:19-08:00
b10b

Market Level 4Community Level 7
970 posts

On Feb 26, 2015, keybol said:

I was comparing browser based games for HTML5 and flash.

>60% of today's web browser traffic can't run SWF (due to mobile audience share and other limitations).  So if we compare no-games-at-all to crappy-games the latter wins.

During SWF's rapid growth period (2004-2009) most of the successful games were crappy.  They were crappy not only in comparison to what we see today, but also crappy in comparison to the installable games (aka Apps) of the time.  So being crappy isn't really a show stopper; it represents opportunity to newcomers and disappointment to veterans.

posted 2015-02-27T16:43:30-08:00 | edited 2015-02-27T16:45:30-08:00
Archbob

Market Level 7Community Level 10
1164 posts

Totor said:

Archbob said:

Also for the browser market, ad blockers are becoming a large issue.

the advertisers shot first.

If there were no interstitials, popup and screaming video ads there would be no need for ad blockers.


Same nonsensical justification logic that Internet pirates give when stealing videos and music and shoplifters give when stealing merchandise, "if it didn't cost so much, I wouldn't have to steal it".

posted 2015-02-27T16:54:22-08:00