What type of HTML5 games make the most money?

56 posts (showing 1-20)
Vetas

Market Level 0Community Level 0
1044 posts

HTML5 seems to be getting more and more popular by the minute, so I was wondering if you guys could share what you know about the market. What are some of the most lucrative types of HTML5 games to make right now and why? What sort of game has the most appeal?

posted 2014-06-20T19:26:29-07:00
GameOp

Market Level 3Community Level 3
206 posts

I'm not an expert in the field but it seems to be minor or simple games with pretty graphics. Examples would be flappy bird, 2048, or tetris. This involves targeting the working/studying demographic as that seems to be profitable. Aiming for html5 games that work on mobile device browsers will probably give you a good income.

posted 2014-06-21T07:27:11-07:00 | edited 2014-06-23T18:43:51-07:00
sandeep410

Market Level 1Community Level 3
179 posts

A game with good graphics is what appeal to sponsors

posted 2014-06-21T07:30:46-07:00
blackmoondev

Market Level 7Community Level 3
253 posts

"What type of HTML5 games make the most money?"

A: Good ones

posted 2014-06-23T08:07:02-07:00
Vetas

Market Level 0Community Level 0
1044 posts

Anything more specific than "small games" or "good games"? I feel like this is a huge topic area and I'm not getting much information. Perhaps everyone is hoarding their secrets? :)

posted 2014-06-23T18:03:30-07:00
GameOp

Market Level 3Community Level 3
206 posts

We gave you our secrets, its pretty art with games optimized to run on a multitude of mobile device browsers. Now It's up to you on what you can create with limited hardware. Html5 sponsors are different, mobile browser performance and pretty art is key to getting sales. However, If your games are amazing then even flash sponsors will offer on it along with html5 ones.

ShooterMG said:

Anything more specific than "small games" or "good games"? I feel like this is a huge topic area and I'm not getting much information. Perhaps everyone is hoarding their secrets? :)

posted 2014-06-23T18:49:09-07:00 | edited 2014-06-24T06:11:11-07:00
Christian223

Market Level 3Community Level 3
181 posts

Games with profesional graphics are a must. Also, very simple rules, very easy to learn, not frustrating, or too hard, basically a casual game. Sponsor seem to love upgrade progressions though, in game shops and things like that. 

posted 2014-06-24T17:19:40-07:00
Vetas

Market Level 0Community Level 0
1044 posts

So does that mean then that, for example, platformers do well if they have professional graphics? Does the game not matter, only the graphics?

posted 2014-06-25T17:07:03-07:00
b10b

Market Level 4Community Level 7
970 posts

ShooterMG said:

So does that mean then that, for example, platformers do well if they have professional graphics? Does the game not matter, only the graphics?

Only the thumbnail and the ★★★★☆ matter.  Both can be bought on Fiverr.com, where purchasing choices will also be entirely based on thumbnail and ★★★★☆.

posted 2014-06-25T17:15:09-07:00
Vetas

Market Level 0Community Level 0
1044 posts

I don't understand what those stars mean. Ratings?

posted 2014-06-25T17:32:00-07:00
b10b

Market Level 4Community Level 7
970 posts

Yeh, ratings, sadly.  Mostly because of free-to-play games being so disposable in the eyes of a player, implied social standing (and thumbnail) are crucial.

I have observed few HTML5 games are scoring highly in app marketplaces - possibly because they are competing directly with native apps that can be fatter and faster?  Technical excuses don't buy any slack either.

So I'd consider that in genre choice ... what can HTML5 do better than native?

posted 2014-06-25T18:43:26-07:00
True Valhalla

Market Level 0Community Level 0
18 posts

I wouldn't make a platformer. You want to make simple casual games. Keep the scope limited and focus on engaging pick-up-and-play gameplay.

posted 2014-07-02T00:25:16-07:00
GameOp

Market Level 3Community Level 3
206 posts

If you want proper advice, this man is to be trusted since he's well known in the html5 community.

Although if I do recall there are some html5 platform games that have been sponsored, especially by big wigs like -removed- but they kinda were an exception, and were addicting due to its simple control scheme. Plus they were optimized for mobile devices.

On Jul 01, 2014, True Valhalla said:

I wouldn't make a platformer. You want to make simple casual games. Keep the scope limited and focus on engaging pick-up-and-play gameplay.

posted 2014-07-02T06:56:59-07:00 | edited 2014-07-02T07:34:47-07:00
True Valhalla

Market Level 0Community Level 0
18 posts

You could definitely make a successful and profitable platformer, but it's just not the most viable option from a financial standpoint. They're also not quite so well suited to mobile control schemes and sometimes older mobile devices won't respond well to anything beyond individual taps/clicks.

When you're working with serious technical limitations in a fragmented market like this, simplicity is the key.

posted 2014-07-02T08:30:02-07:00
sandeep410

Market Level 1Community Level 3
179 posts

Platformers do work well and they do sell too. Also good thing about them is that they are easily reskinnable. But in the end graphics is everything

posted 2014-07-02T10:48:35-07:00
capybaracreations

Market Level 2Community Level 2
132 posts

Hello ShooterMG!

I want to share my experience and listen what others have to say about it : )!

I don't think platformer games are actually a viable option. Graphics and sounds really matter.
Another aspect that I've found sponsors to be looking for is good, fullscreen scaling, performance, and most of all fun. If I remember correctly, FGL rates submitted games in terms of Intuitiveness, Graphics, Sound, Fun, Polish, Overall; so I think the most important in HTML5 dev is: polish, fun and graphics.

The best are simple games, like simple runners/avoiders, match games and this stuff. Personally I'm really intrigued about puzzle games, people I know say that on the overall game dev market, strategy genre is in high demand. But strategy games are in no way "simple", that's why I'm thinking about creating some fun puzzle games, like Cut the rope or something like this. Also in my opinion such game shouldn't have high difficulty, playing game on mobile without having to install it is kind of being lazy, that's why I think a game that's short but fun has the most probability to be successful.

Another thing is the price, it's the hardest thing to understand for me now. People say that you shouldn't set/accept price lower than 400$, well ok, but when I was looking at some games and offers on them, I've never actually saw a game sell for more than 650$. But I know that if you set the price for 100-300 you can easily find someone even if the game is actually not that good. I think some devs allowed low prices and actually pretty lowered the average market price.

Also I like how ShooterMG asked for genre type and people answered good games, that's not even an answer, that's something obvious. Right now, I've 2-3 projects that I want to finish in June, after that I think I'm going to try something with easy puzzles.

Sorry for any grammatical errors, I hope you will find my post helpful a little bit ShooterMG : )!

posted 2014-07-02T16:39:21-07:00 | edited 2014-07-02T17:23:37-07:00
GameOp

Market Level 3Community Level 3
206 posts

True Valhalla said:

When you're working with "serious technical limitations in a fragmented market" like this, simplicity is the key.

It seems a lot of html5 developers are still ignoring this unfortunately, considering it's one of the most important things to keep in mind when developing an html5 game.

@capybaracreations

I can definetly agree that the scoring for html5 is a bit overlooked. But we did kinda did give the idea, casual games is a genre isn't it?

Html5 game should usually be optimized to run on EDGE or older android devices to get a more broader publisher base.

Some publishers have limits, which we have seen such as this one:

" The game must be 3MB or lower including all code, assets and sound files "

Not all sponsors need this, but some. If you base your games on these guidelines then you can self contact sponsors and try to strike a deal with them.

posted 2014-07-02T17:06:31-07:00 | edited 2014-07-02T20:58:38-07:00
b10b

Market Level 4Community Level 7
970 posts

I find Captain Obvious advice to be counter productive (ebooks in this space are full of vague & generic, rather than data & case study).

Today the biggest money making games (HTML5 or otherwise) are casino games (or close derivatives). Often white labelled to recognised media brands with value being assessed by factors other than revenue. The boundaries between gambling and playing is increasingly blurred.  Is that your bag?

Isn't the indie market the polar opposite?  I try to have fun with it and push the boundaries of an unexplored frontier.

posted 2014-07-02T18:18:30-07:00
ozdy

Market Level 6Community Level 13
1482 posts

On Jul 02, 2014, GameOp said:

If you want proper advice, this man is to be trusted since he's well known in the html5 community.

Well known to act childish and promote his thin and info deficient ebook left and right. Known for his big portfolio of basic games, many of which he hasn't coded himself, lucky to start very early in HTML5 though I admit, but nothing to be admired for.

Anyway, I know only one platformer and the sponsor said it's doing very well. I am making a platformer now, after having made 10+ physics games (they sold well, but aren't popular nowadays).

posted 2014-07-03T13:53:58-07:00
Vetas

Market Level 0Community Level 0
1044 posts

ozdy said:

On Jul 02, 2014, GameOp said:

If you want proper advice, this man is to be trusted since he's well known in the html5 community.

Well known to act childish and promote his thin and info deficient ebook left and right. Known for his big portfolio of basic games, many of which he hasn't coded himself, lucky to start very early in HTML5 though I admit, but nothing to be admired for.

ozdy I think he's right about his claim that platformers won't sell as well as simpler types of games. I specifically used 'platformer' in my question earlier because I already know they don't sell well as mobile apps or Flash anymore, so he basically confirmed my suspicions. 

ozdy said:

Anyway, I know only one platformer and the sponsor said it's doing very well. I am making a platformer now, after having made 10+ physics games (they sold well, but aren't popular nowadays).

What is the name of this platformer you said was doing well?

posted 2014-07-03T14:35:59-07:00